martes, 30 de septiembre de 2008

Portrait in Jazz (1960)





Bill Evans Trio:
Bill Evans (piano); Scott LaFaro (bass); Paul Motian (drums). Recorded at Reeves Sound Studios, New York, New York on December 28, 1959. Originally released on Riverside (1162).


Tracks:
1. Come Rain Or Come Shine 2. Autumn Leaves - (take 1) 3. Autumn Leaves - (mono, bonus track) 4. Witchcraft 5. When I Fall In Love 6. Peri's Scope 7. What Is This Thing Called Love? 8. Spring Is Here 9. Someday My Prince Will Come 10. Blue In Green - (take 3) 11. Blue In Green - (take 2, bonus track)

SEE...

"A few months to set things up and the trio was ready for its first recording session. Evans had met LaFaro at an audition for Chet Baker a couple of years earlier. He had not been very favorably impressed at the time by LaFaro's rather effusive, show-offish nature. Born in Newark, New Jersey in 1936, he was, after all, still young. But when the two began to work together with Motian, Evans' respect for the 23-year-old bass player grew rapidly. “He and Paul and I agreed without speaking a word about the type of freedom and responsibility we wanted to bring to bear upon the music, to get the development we wanted without putting repressive restrictions upon ourselves,” Evans himself reported.

It is worth noting that the tendency towards a freer approach to trio playing, his idea of a sort of collective "three-way improvisation", came to Evans, at least in part, from his reflections on classical music; (remember that at that time the bass and drums usually had a pretty static role as simple support to the piano). In fact, as Evans noted,

“in a classical composition you don’t hear a part remain stagnant until it becomes a solo. There are transitional development passages. A voice begins to be heard more and more and finally breaks into prominence;” and, as if to prevent a possibly too sharp break with tradition, he added: “Especially, I want my work - and the trio's if possible to sing. I want to play what I like to hear. I am not going to be strange or new just to be strange or new. If what I do grows that way naturally, that'll be OK. But it must have that wonderful feeling of singing.”
Singing is a way of being still, we are reminded by Vladimir Jankelevitch, and the silence is itself a constitutive element in audible music. These profound truths are made real in the work of the Evans/LaFaro/Motian trio which, aside from Davis, Lester Young and maybe some coolsters like Lee Konitz, had few precedents in jazz. This music had always been extroverted, communicative and open to the world outside, but in the late 50s it seemed to be expressing a need to withdraw into the artist's most ineffable and interior world. Bill Evans, his music, and even his characteristic physical posture became a visual symbol of this trend: all curled up over the piano he looked like one trying to grasp the intimate nature of the instrument and his own as well.

After Kind Of Blue, Evans recorded with Lee Konitz and Jimmy Giuffre, took part in the recording of John Lewis' sound track for Robert Wise's film Odds Against Tomorrow, and recorded many times with Tony Scott. After one more recording with Lee Konitz’s tentette in October, Bill finally got into the recording studio with LaFaro and Motian on December 28th 1959. Evans, at slightly more than thirty years old, was about to begin surely the most important musical adventure of his entire artistic career.

Portrait In Jazz [Riverside RLP-1161; OJCCD 088-2] was the first of four albums that the trio were to make - a limited production but of the highest artistic quality, which was to influence whole generations of jazz musicians all over the world. The trio's innovative intentions were only partially carried out in Portrait In Jazz. Evans was aware, as were his partners, that “nobody at that time was 'opening up music like they were, letting the music originate from a beat that was more implied than explicit.” He had a gift for shaping music and a capacity to make every part of the improvisation spring consequentially from the previous one: an approach that the pianist asked his partners to extend to the total form of the piece. When it worked, when the three of them played like one single individual entity, the result was breathtaking. Autumn Leaves (second version) is an example of that success, as is What Is This Thing Called Love. Here the trio offers a glimpse into some completely new mechanisms: like when Motian ventures into audacious multi-rhythmical initiatives, with LaFaro strongly and profoundly accenting the pulse; or when, in the same piece, they experiment with the dynamic contrast between duet (Evans and LaFaro dialoguing while Motian stays silent) and fully active trio.

Portrait In Jazz contains some interpretive peaks that highlight Evans' more meditative and lyrical side and the profundity of what he had to say: Spring Is Here, above all. According to Wilfrid Mellers this piece retains the sound mood of Miles Davis. Hc observes that Evans' ability “to make melodic lines ‘speak’ is of extraordinary subtlety... and always the sensuousness leads not to passivity but to growth,” adding that on the album’s fast pieces “the rhythm zest provokes the song.” On Spring Is Here Evans’ piano breathes, and his emotion makes the instrument vibrate with a gentle, resonant sonority - as always, the consequence of the nature of the musical narration that he is improvising and never mere decoration or narcissism. Through a simple song, Evans talks about a part of himself, and the piano is his voice.
The performances on Portrait In Jazz are uneven from the point of view of the "simultaneous improvisation" approach, which had not yet developed at the time. The artistic rendition also doesn't always maintain the same level. Evans would later say, for instance, that the version of When Fall In Love on this album was one of the most incoherent and disconnected that he had ever recorded; and, in effect, upon careful listening, one discovers here and there some empty, somewhat ingenuous areas in the construction of the solo. Evans was notoriously demanding with himself and here he recognized some gaps in the logic of the solo that couldn't help but bother him.

The opposite was true for Peri’s Scope (in one of the plays on words which he loved to indulge himself in, Evans dedicated the song to Peri Cousins, his girlfriend at the time). The tune is a little masterpiece in improvisational compactness. There is no trace of evident interplay between the musicians, at least in the sense of a contrapuntal or melodic dialogue, but there is certainly a lot of swing and a great elegance here. Evans converses with himself; his solo an admirable example of that logical structuring and consequentiality, both main features and his principle objective in music. LaFaro, and Motian accompany Evans in the usual 4/4 time, but with such energy and joy, along with enormous precision, that a kind of precious carpet is woven upon which Evans' rhythmic inner feeling comfortably reclines. Evans displays a very innovative use of the left hand, which seems to move in perfect tandem with that of Motian playing the snare drum. This creates an imaginative, cheerful rhythmical counterpoint to the phrases of his right hand. So, in a little more than three minutes Peri’s Scope leaves an impression of vitality and pleasure in making music not frequently matched in Evans' musical production. In this luminous gem he seems to get back a little of that pleasure of carefree play rarely perceptible in his performances - the piece almost smiles.
Finally, in terms of Evans' trio work, Blue In Green should not be forgotten. This is the piece for which Evans had claimed paternity and which, for incomprehensible reasons, was and continues to be attributed to Davis. [emphasis mine]. Actually, Miles, before the Kind Of Blue session, had only given Evans the first two chords, from which the pianist spun the entire composition. In any case, in this trio version of the tune, he doubles the time twice, allowing LaFaro to move completely autonomously, both melodically and rhythmically. Apart from this number, however, the general atmosphere of the album does not sound as revolutionary as the trio's live performances a year and a half later at the Village Vanguard would. More than a year were to pass between the trio's first and second recordings."
(Bill Evans: Ritratto d’artista con pianoforte/Bill Evans: The Pianist as an Artist.Enrico Pieranunzi, Rome 1999, Stampa Alternativa)(thanks http://jazzprofiles.blogspot.com !!!)

17 comentarios:

Anónimo dijo...

http://rapidshare.com/files/129290437/01-BEp-1959-PIJ.part1.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/129291512/01-BEp-1959-PIJ.part2.rar

gracias al uploader original

Anónimo dijo...

http://rapidshare.com/files/130463431/10431.part1.rar

http://rapidshare.com/files/130453251/10431.part2.rar

raskol dijo...

Genial tu aporte, en serio. Tengo varias de esas piezas, pero no todas completas en un disco. Ya lo bajo

Anónimo dijo...

Thanks for Bill Evans. The world is a better place because of his music.

Marcelo dijo...

Hola Manuel, me bajé este disco de bill que según allmusic es un destacado .. veremos.

Igual lo poco que escuché de evans me gustó.

Alguno mas para recomendar??..

Abrazo grande, Marcelo (Universo Spinetta)

Anónimo dijo...

Thank you, that was extremely valuable and interesting...I will be back again to read more on this topic.

Anónimo dijo...

Thanks for sharing this link, but unfortunately it seems to be offline... Does anybody have a mirror or another source? Please answer to my post if you do!

I would appreciate if a staff member here at theuniversalmindof.blogspot.com could post it.

Thanks,
Jack

Anónimo dijo...

Thanks for writing, Jack. My name is Manuel, I'm solely responsible for the blog, and I can not really take care of everything for lack of time and my personal work, I promise when I can upload it again. Meanwhile if someone does ... you know, it's just post it anonymously. thanks in advance to all.

Anónimo dijo...

Remember that the publication system is always an anonymous publication system. This is the blog that we keep, all those who enjoy it.
thanks again.
Manu.

Anónimo dijo...

Thanks for sharing the link, but unfortunately it seems to be offline... Does anybody have a mirror or another source? Please answer to my post if you do!

I would appreciate if a staff member here at theuniversalmindof.blogspot.com could post it.

Thanks,
Daniel

Anónimo dijo...

Hey,

I have a message for the webmaster/admin here at theuniversalmindof.blogspot.com.

Can I use part of the information from this blog post right above if I provide a link back to your website?

Thanks,
Daniel

Anónimo dijo...

Thanks for sharing this link, but argg it seems to be offline... Does anybody have a mirror or another source? Please answer to my post if you do!

I would appreciate if a staff member here at theuniversalmindof.blogspot.com could post it.

Thanks,
John

Anónimo dijo...

Have you considered the fact that this might work another way? I am wondering if anyone else has come across something
similar in the past? Let me know your thoughts...

Anónimo dijo...

Hi,

I have a question for the webmaster/admin here at theuniversalmindof.blogspot.com.

Can I use part of the information from your post right above if I provide a link back to your site?

Thanks,
Peter

Anónimo dijo...

and also, as you can see, repeated comments by altering the names of those who comment, well... that I do not interested, I respond politely and hope that the blog works as a trigger of the music of Bill. Greetings! Manu.

Anónimo dijo...

Greetings,

Thanks for sharing this link - but unfortunately it seems to be down? Does anybody here at theuniversalmindof.blogspot.com have a mirror or another source?


Cheers,
Alex

Anónimo dijo...

subanlo otra vez! :D